Risk of CVD: Sugary fruit juice or soda drinks?

May 23, 2020
Drinks
Drinking one or more of any type of sugary beverage daily was associated with a 26 per cent higher likelihood of needing a revascularization procedure, such as angioplasty to open clogged arteries (Photo Credit: Stock Photo)

SUGARY beverages like fruit juice drinks and softdrinks both were associated to cause cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Women whose diet is more on sugars have higher risk to develop the disease.

According to a study, women who have at least one fruit drink a day are more likely to suffer heart disease than those who drink a fizzy soda once a day.

Researchers said drinking one or more of any type of sugary drink a day was associated with a 26 per cent higher likelihood of needing a revascularization procedure.

A study of more than 100,00 women found one or more sugar-added fruit drinks a day increased the risk of cardiovascular disease by 42 per cent. In contrast, a fizzy drink a day was associated with only a 23 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease.  

In the study, drinking one or more of any type of sugary beverage daily was associated with a 26 per cent higher likelihood of needing a revascularization procedure, such as angioplasty to open clogged arteries.

When compared to people who never or rarely drink sugar-added drinks, people having one a day were found to have a 21 per cent increased chance of a stroke. 

None of the women in the study had been diagnosed with heart disease, stroke or diabetes when they enrolled.

Women with the highest sugary drink intake were younger, more likely to be smokers, obese and less likely to eat healthy foods, the study found.

A fizzy drink a day was associated with only a 23 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease when compared to people who drink no sugary drinks every day.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends limiting added sugar to no more than 100 calories a day - the equivalent of six teaspoons of sugar - for most women, and no more than 150 calories - nine teaspoons of sugar - for most men.

Sugar-sweetened drinks can increase blood pressure and the risk of obesity.

Some drinks contain upwards of 40 grams of sugar—equivalent to about 10 teaspoons of sugar—and 200 or more calories in a 12-ounce serving.

In February, research by AHA and American Stroke Association found two cans of sugar-free fizzy drinks per day could increase a woman's risk of a heart attack or stroke by almost a third.

The major study of over 80,000 women found those who regularly drank fizz were 31 per cent more likely to have a stroke caused by a blood clot, 29 per cent more likely to develop heart disease and 16 per cent more likely to die, when compared to women who rarely drank them.

In March, Harvard School of Public Health concluded that as well as weight gain, diabetes, heart disease and stroke, the more sugary drinks a person consumed the more their risk of early death from any cause increased. The link with heart disease was particularly strong.

Sweetened soft drinks - such as cordial or fizzy pop - increases cancer risk by 19 per cent. (AHA)